Posts tagged ‘Iran’

March 7, 2012

Iran’s Unacceptable Enrichment – Robert Zubrin – National Review Online

Iran’s Unacceptable Enrichment – Robert Zubrin – National Review Online.

There has been much public discussion recently about the Iranian nuclear program, particularly the question of when it might be determined that it had crossed a “red line” defining it conclusively as a nuclear-weapons, rather than a power-reactor, program. An analysis of Iran’s actual production suggests that the line has already been crossed.

Some of the discussion has been quite absurd. For example, page 1 of the February 25 New York Times features a story entitled “U.S. Agencies See No Move by Iran to Build a Bomb.” Meanwhile, on page 8 of the very same edition, David Sanger and William Broad report that International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors have determined that Iran is now producing large quantities of 20-percent–enriched uranium-235 in a facility located under 250 feet of granite protection. Since commercial reactors require only 3-percent–enriched uranium-235, a factory producing 20-percent–enriched fissile material is clearly part of a nuclear-weapons program.

January 5, 2012

Oil prices: What happens if Iran shuts down the Strait of Hormuz? – CSMonitor.com

Oil prices: What happens if Iran shuts down the Strait of Hormuz? – CSMonitor.com.

If the rhetoric doesn’t calm down, it may not be long before the price of oil moves into the $110- to $125-a-barrel range, energy analysts say.

At issue is a significant amount of the world’s oil that moves by sea. In 2011, about 17 million barrels of oil per day, or about 35 percent of the world’s seaborne traded oil, moved through the Strait of Hormuz, the US Energy Information Administration estimates. Much of this oil flows to AsiaJapan, China, India, and other emerging economies. But some of the oil flows to Europe, and a relatively small amount – some 1.1 million barrels per day – goes to the United States.

January 5, 2012

Oil Price Would Skyrocket if Iran Closed the Strait of Hormuz – Yahoo! Finance

Oil Price Would Skyrocket if Iran Closed the Strait of Hormuz – Yahoo! Finance.

HOUSTON — If Iran were to follow through with its threat to blockade the Strait of Hormuz, a vital transit route for almost one-fifth of the oil traded globally, the impact would be immediate: Energy analysts say the price of oil would start to soar and could rise 50 percent or more within days.

September 8, 2011

Moving Beyond OPEC: Energizing the Economy with a Viable Energy Policy – Kellie Dunlap

During Spring, oil prices reached over $100 dollars per barrel­ ­̶  the highest price since 2008.  This summer, oil prices fell due to the global economic recession.  In direct correlation to the volatile oil market that followed the Spring price hikes, the U.S. domestic economy has floundered. With minimal job growth, rises in food prices and debilitating effects on the housing market, it becomes apparent just how much high oil prices  impact the U.S. economy.

Clemson University Professor David Bodde says, “What we are seeing in terms of the price [of oil] is more of a financial demand phenomenon more than a supply and demand phenomenon.”  Bodde further explains that in order for the economy to recover, oil prices need to be consistent. However, there is little the U.S.  government can do to influence the global price of oil since it is a fungible commodity and the U.S. only produces about 8% of the world’s total supply.

OPEC , the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, sets the global price of oil since they are the largest petroleum producers; theoretically basing the price of oil on supply and demand.  However, history suggests that supply and demand is not the determining factor of oil prices. Gal Luft, executive director of the Institute for the Analysis of Global Security (IAGS) argues that, among other factors, the recent inter-organizational politics of OPEC may further exacerbate the unpredictability of oil prices in the near future.

In late July, Islamic Revolutionary Guards veteran Rostam Ghasemi was appointed the new petroleum minister of Iran.  Iranian President, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad explained that the nomination of Ghasemi will promote Iran’s objective to align the complex oil industry with its national interests. Iran currently holds OPEC’s  rotating presidential seat.  Therefore, Ghasemi will act as the de-facto president of OPEC in the coming months.

Ghasemi, a former Chief Commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard, will be sure to uphold Iranian national interests, which poses a threat to Saudi Arabia’s longstanding control of OPEC decision-making.  Luft contends that, while there is the obvious historical Sunni-Shia rift between Saudi Arabia and Iran, as well as the ideological dispute over regional hegemonic power, there is another contentious issue at hand; instead of the member states of OPEC falling in line with Saudi Arabia’s decisions as they have in the past, they are now attempting to raise the price of oil to cover their own economic needs. Both Iran and Saudi Arabia are largely dependent on oil revenues.  However, Iran would rather see the price of oil per barrel around $140 in order to balance its budget. Saudi Arabia, on the other hand, can maintain its budget with oil prices about $90 per barrel.

In June, OPEC members, for the first time in two decades, were unable to agree to an increase in output levels or establish the price of oil per barrel.  The widespread civil unrest in many Middle Eastern countries has weakened their economies, causing OPEC members to make decisions individually rather than as an organization.  These disparities, coupled with Iran and Venezuela’s insistence on higher oil prices, have divided OPEC’s members and reduced Saudi Arabia’s influence. With Rostem Ghasemi holding the reins of OPEC, the international community will likely see inflated oil prices for the remainder of the year.

2011 has illustrated that dependence on foreign oil makes the U.S. economy vulnerable- America can no longer afford to be at the whim of OPEC .  With Middle Eastern civil turmoil, revolutions, and power politics, America needs to end its dependence on foreign oil.  The government should be focusing on utilizing all available resources in order to become energy independent.  On shore and offshore drilling should be permitted; natural gas expansion should be encouraged; clean coal production for the purpose of creating fuel via methanol should also be pursued, as well as the continuing production of biomass fuel.  By acknowledging that capricious oil prices are the source of our economic problems, we can work to solve the problem by reducing our dependence on foreign oil, which will create long-term employment and help to balance the trade deficit.

As gas prices continue to range between $80-$100 dollars per barrel, Americans will pay $500 billion to OPEC and other foreign governments this year alone. While the President prepares to address Congress regarding job creation on Thursday, America should be demanding that he and Congress create an effective energy policy that will mobilize multiple sectors of the economy rather than simply promoting each party’s preferred energy sources.  Until this occurs, we can be sure to see further unemployment, a depressed economy and higher prices at the pump.

August 17, 2011

OPEC Under New Management; Iran’s Management – Gal Luft

OPEC Under New Management; Iran’s Management. The recent appointment of Islamic Revolutionary Guards veteran Rostam Ghasemi as Iran’s new petroleum minister is not only the Islamic Republic’s latest poke in America’s eye but it is also harbinger of things to come with respect to Iran’s petro-politics.

Ghasemi, a notorious hardliner and the head of the economic wing of the Guards, is personally sanctioned by both the EU and the US. In his new position he will be able to do exactly what his patron Mahmoud Ahmadinejad explained in his nomination support speech before the Majlis: “transform this complex [oil industry] in line with national interests.”